Starting Medical School: Rules of the Road

In the next few weeks 17,000 college graduates will start the process of becoming lifelong students of medicine.   Medical school is a wonderful, but at times difficult experience.  Here are five “rules” that I hope will help with this exciting transition.

 

1. You can drink from a fire hydrant, but you’ll need to learn how.

The amount of information you are going to be exposed to in medical school is logarithmically more than you had to learn in college.  At Baylor (where I teach) we calculate that the first year of medical school is the undergraduate equivalent of 22 hours of course work per semester.  It really is like being asked to drink from a fire hydrant.   You are going to have to study more, study better and actually use the time in class to learn.  The first year or two of medical school may, at times, seem like an obstacle course you have to “get through” to get to the “real stuff”.  But these first two years are important; You are learning a new vocabulary… a new language.  If you don’t learn the breadth and depth of this new language, when it comes time to apply it to patient care you won’t be “fluent”.   By the way, sometime during the first month or two of medical school you will think that a) everyone here is smarter than I am, b) the admissions committee must have made a mistake and I’m not really supposed to be here and c) there is absolutely no way to read all of this material.  But, like everyone who has done this before you, will discover that a) you are just as smart as everyone else (sometimes in different ways, but equally effective) b) nobody made a mistake – you really are supposed to be here and c) you have to change the way you study, but you really can learn this much material.

 

2. Make your bed.

You wanted to become a doctor for a myriad of reasons, but one of them was surely because service to others is important for you.   Therefore, you are already primed to sacrifice a lot of your needs for other people.  Sacrifice is part of the culture of medicine.  But, it’s like a Starling curve… a little sacrifice makes you better, but too much makes you ineffective.  “Make your bed” is a simple rule (and action) which helps you remember that you need to take care of your environment, your fitness, your nutrition and your spiritual wellbeing as you are learning how to become a physician.

 

3. Act like a doctor – starting now.

We (all practicing physicians) see you as a doctor already.  I know this is a really hard concept for first year medical students, but it’s absolutely true.  You have started your apprenticeship and, unless you are one of the very, very few who change their mind, you will have an MD after your name in 4 years.  With all of the joys and privileges that come with this role, there are a few responsibilities to start thinking about as well.  Start thinking about your decisions, words and actions and how they might be interpreted by patients or colleagues.  It’s no longer acceptable to put anything you want on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter or other social media.  How you dress and act when you are in professional settings will be important.  You’ll learn more specific details about professional behavior from your professors and colleagues as your training progresses, but the core values of medical professionalism start when you enter the profession, which is now.

 

4. Kindness matters.

It is remarkable how our paths in medicine cross over and over again.  The person sitting next to you on the first day of medical school may be someone who will be an intern with you in 4 years or who will refer you patients 10 years from now.  You and your classmates will be going through classes together (like you did in college), but this is different.  You are starting your professional life together as well.  The camaraderie that results is a gift and is also very important personally and professionally.  Don’t blow off the class events.  Don’t stay home to study instead of going to class.  Go out of your way to meet everyone in your class and really get to know them.  Cultivate and nurture these important friendships.

 

5. Enjoy the journey

You are about to embark on a life changing (and fulfilling) journey.  This journey is a privilege and it is very, very special.  Take a few minutes everyday to write down the events of the day.  The first time you hear a murmur in a heart will be just that – the first time.  Take a minute to record what that was like.  You are going to have a lot to process as you start studying anatomy – more than just the names of the structure.  “Talking” about it in a journal is a great way to make the transition we all make in the anatomy lab.   There are also going to be some hilarious stories and events that you’ll forget if you don’t write them down.  When you look at them later, you’ll be glad you recorded them with words, photos, or drawings.

 

“Our study is man, as the subject of accidents or disease. Were he always, inside and outside, cast in the same mould, instead of differing from his fellow man as much in constitution and in his reaction to stimulus as in feature, we should ere this have reached some settled principles in our art.”

William Osler, from Teacher and Student, in Aequanimitas.

 

 

 

One thought on “Starting Medical School: Rules of the Road

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s