Healthy Recipes: 101 Cookbooks

It’s been a while since I posted about cooking and the pizza rule”. If you are trying to eat well as a medical student or resident, the key to success is planning, finding simple healthy recipes, and cooking for yourself.

101 Cookbooks has recipes that are healthy and many that are fast… but a few minutes on this beautiful blog will also feel like a “mini-vacation”. Heidi Swanson’s beautiful writing about food and travel, her award winning images plus the wonderful recipes make this time well spent.

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Summer Vegetable Curry

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Kale Market Salad

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Best School Lunch: Sicilian Broccoli and Cauliflower Pasta

 

* The “pizza rule”: Find recipes that let you cook dinner in less time than it takes to order a pizza.

Eating on the Run

“Downside, I skipped lunch and it is still in the work fridge. Upside, I don’t have to pack a lunch tomorrow!” – tweet from a new intern on her first day of work

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July 1st has arrived and a new group of interns are learning that’s it’s hard to eat well when you are crazy busy taking care of patients. Doctors really do know about nutrition, and we know we should set a good example. So why do we eat so poorly at work?  I can’t do better than the list of reasons from this post:

1.  The ”I don’t know when I’ll get to eat again” Phenomenon

2.  The “Graham Crackers and Peanut Butter” Phenomenon

3.  The “It’s free, therefore I must eat it” Phenomenon.

4.  The “I’m so tired I have to eat something to stay awake” Phenomenon

5.  The “I’m on call so I deserve a giant cookie” Phenomenon

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Why it’s important to make conscious choices about what you eat at work 

1. You actually hurt your patients if you don’t eat well. 

Physicians that don’t eat at work have slower simple and complex reaction times. You don’t think as clearly or respond as quickly. Start thinking about your own nutrition as a part of good patient care.

 2. If you are like most people, not eating at work will result in gaining weight.  

Even if you don’t gain weight, you will likely have a detrimental change in your body composition. (i.e. you’ll get flabby)

3. Not eating at work will result in losing weight for some people. 

For some people stress leads to appetite loss.  These are the residents that aren’t hungry even though they are not eating enough. The message here is that your weight during residency is a decent barometer of your stress level and how well you are coping.  If you are losing or gaining, notice it early and adjust how you are eating, working out and coping with the stress of your job.

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There’s no question that the best option is to plan, prepare and bring your own food to work.  Even though it takes time to do this, you’ll save time in the hospital by knowing what you have and where it is.  (A good point made in the article “Strategies Resident-Physicians Use to Manage Sleep Loss and Fatigue” which you can download from http://med-ed-online.net/index.php/meo/article/download/4376/4558). Food choices in the hospital are limited, often poor,  and not always available. Make time on the weekends to plan for the upcoming week and shop for good food.  If you can, choose one healthy recipe to cook on your day off and make enough that you have plenty of meals in the refrigerator for when you get home.

General principles 

  • Eat at least every 6 hours.  It’s probably better if you eat smaller amounts every 3-4 hours.  Eat even if you are “not hungry” if it’s been 4-6 hours since your last meal.
  • Make sure you are getting plenty of protein.  Eating simple carbohydrates makes you less alert and creates bigger swings of insulin levels.
  • Don’t drink your calories.  (But do drink enough water)
  • The processed comfort foods that appear like magic in hospitals (doughnuts, pizza, etc) seem delicious when you eat them, but are terrible for you.
  • Plan, plan, plan.  It’s worth it.
  • Eat fruits and/or vegetables with every meal.
  • Bring good food from home.  If you don’t cook, buy good food to bring.
  • Make sure you have “pocket food” in your pocket at all times.  (Food that fits in your pocket and doesn’t need refrigeration.) You may not be able to stop for a real meal, but you’ll be able to eat something.

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Examples of  “pocket foods”

  • Kind bars.  Many meal replacement bars might as well be candy bars when you look at the ingredients.  Clif, Larabar, and Odwalla are all good choices.  Kind bars have no added sugar, a fair amount of protein and are made of only real food.
  • Peanut butter and jelly sandwich.  (Whole wheat bread, fruit spread, peanut butter without transfats)
  • Cabot 50% cheese or string cheese (higher protein, lower fat than most cheese)
  • Edamame (shelled is easier)
  • Homemade Trail mix – mix different nuts and dried fruits together and put in snack bags
  • Baked or steamed sweet potatoes with a little salt
  • Fruit

Healthy, Fast, Easy (and delicious) Recipes: CookingLight.com

It’s not easy to eat well as a medical student, resident or busy physician.  Besides setting a good example, eating well is important to feel well when working hard. .. not to mention it really pays off in the long run.  You don’t have to spend hours in the kitchen to eat well at work but you do have to cook (some) and plan (always).

One of my favorite sites to find healthy, easy, delicious recipes is cookinglight.com.  They have sections like  Superfast Stir-Fries and Sautés and Quick and Healthy Recipes which are fantastic for busy clinicians.  If you aren’t a cook, they also have a section called Cooking 101 where you can learn basic techniques.  Before you say you “can’t cook” remember – If you can learn anatomy, you can learn to cook!

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Coconut Curried Pork, Snow Pea, and Mango Stir-Fry

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Healthy, homemade steak house pizza

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Chickpea Bajane

Gifts for Medical Students, Residents and Physicians

The holidays are quickly approaching and it’s time for my annual list of gift suggestions for medical students, residents and physicians.

  • Top of the list this year (for good reason) is the iPad mini.  I started rounding with an iPad several months ago and was instantly converted. The iPad mini is even better because it fits in my white coat pocket!  I am able to pull up my patient list on our EMR and access lab values and images as I’m walking from room to room.  I can also use it to show families the images, or pull up images from the web to help explain complicated concepts. For students (and all of us) an iPad gives you instant access to information to help in decision making. Most hospitals (if not all) have wi-fi, so the “starter” (i.e. least expensive) version is fine.  There is a big advantage to have 3G capability if you aren’t around wi-fi (just like your phone), but it will add a monthly fee.

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  • For avid readers (of non-medical works), consider a Kindle, Nook, or other electronic reader.  (If you are considering an iPad, it can be used as a reader, so this would be redundant).  These devices can easily go into a backpack or call bag and make it easy to take 5-minute breaks from studying or work.

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  • A new suitcase.  This is particularly important for medical students or residents who will be facing a round of residency or fellowship interviews in the in next year or two (but will be appreciated by anyone!)
  • A maid or housecleaning service once a week.  No one in medical school or residency has time to clean (or likes it)!  This will be one of the most appreciated gifts you’ve ever given someone. Along the same lines, consider a certificate for cleaning or doing laundry once a month (if you are inclined to do it yourself for them.)
  • Ties are usually required on the wards for men.  Good, professional ties will always be a welcome present.  Consider interesting medical ties like the human cell tie, x-ray and ortho themed ties or a human genome tie.    I’m not about to get into the (often heated) discussion about bow ties in medicine, but if you are considering a tie as a present, you might want to ask about bow ties before you buy. No matter what kind of tie you choose, pick one with a subtle theme that you have to look at twice. Don’t get a tie with a caduceus or that’s really blatant (stethoscopes, etc).

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  • All students and residents need good, professional clothes – a gift certificate to a big department store is a good way to let them add to their wardrobe.

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My personal favorite – it rolls away and you have to chase it!

  • Membership to a gym for a year.  Working out is important both for physical and mental health during medical training.  But – unless you know which gym is the closest to where they live (or most used by their friends), it might be better to create a homemade “gift certificate” and let them decide.
  • Anything to help promote more exercise.  A bicycle to commute to school or the hospital?  A gift box with exercise equipment?  Yoga classes? New running shoes?
  • Electronic speakers for their computer to listen to music while studying. Along the same lines, add in a subscription to Pandora One to create and listen to internet radio stations without commercials.
  • Appliances to help with fast, healthy cooking.  Top of my list would be a pressure cooker – either stovetop (which is what I use) or electric.  Another great choice for the money may be the Krups multicooker that is a rice cooker, steamer and slow cooker all in one.
  • A gift certificate to Whole Foods (or any grocery store that makes take out food), or a healthy prepared food service.  In Houston, we have My Fit Foods, Snap Kitchen, Diet Gourmet, Real Meals 365 and several other services.  These types of businesses exist in almost every major city and can be easily found on the internet.

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  • Plush anatomy dolls – particularly appropriate for those who have already chosen a specialty.

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Healthy Recipes: My Life Runs on Food

I’m always looking for new sources of healthy recipes for medical students, residents and busy docs. My Life Runs On Food is self-described asa sweet, savory, buttery, green and healthy food blog” and is written by Sanura Weathers.  As she describes it

“My Life Runs on Food is a blog demonstrating how to plan a well-balanced meal back into our lives. It’ll offer tips on how to “brown bag” yesterday’s dinner for lunch. The blog will suggest which seasonal produce to use in recipes. It will encourage buying food from local retailers, such as farmer’s markets. Read how to adapt life events into a weekly menu, and how to quickly update a menu in the middle of the week because of a sudden change of plans.”

 

 

Tomato Chili Pizza

 

Asian Inspired Peanut Butter Roasted Chicken

 

Couscous with Roasted Cauliflower and Shrimp

 

 

 

 

Fast, Easy Recipes: Canyon Ranch

I’m always looking for sources of recipes that meet my “pizza rule” for cooking.  (Things that take less time to make than it takes to order a pizza).

Stressful work requires good fuel.  Taking time to cook something healthy, satisfying and delicious provides that fuel  – but it also sends a clear message that you are taking care of yourself.  Canyon Ranch  has been teaching people this message for years.  They have a wonderful website with really delicious, easy and healthy recipes.

Recipe for Salmon with Mango Blueberry Salsa

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Recipe for vegetable soup

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Recipe Chicken Apple Quesadilla

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You are going to have to trust me on this one and try it.  This is the most delicious cauliflower you will ever eat

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Recipe for Mashed cauliflower

Setting an Example: Eating Well

At some point all physicians give advice to their patients about dietary changes to improve health.  Let’s be honest.  We don’t do so well ourselves.  The “classic” fare of residency (donuts or muffins for breakfast, pizza for lunch, and some fast food on the way home) doesn’t really give you much credibility when you are talking to patients.

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No medical student or resident is going to be able to eat perfectly, exercise regularly, and do all the other things that lead to a healthier lifestyle.  But every little change you make now will pay off.  You’ll feel better and have more energy.  You’ll be less likely to gain weight.  And – you’ll be able to talk to patients  – with specific examples – about what they can do to improve their own health.

In the crazy busy life of medical school and residency, it’s hard, if not impossible, to spend time and energy to shop, cook and eat really well.  It doesn’t get much better once you start your practice.  What is possible, no matter how busy you are,  is to realize that there are some simple things you can do to improve what you are doing now.

My top 10 tips for better eating in medical school and residency

1.  Eat fruits or vegetables with every meal or snack.  This may mean buying a bag of apples once a week and just eating apples twice a day (boring but effective).  Even better, follow the “USDA plate” recommendation – ½ fruit and vegetable, 1/4 protein 1/4 grain/complex carb on every plate of food you eat.

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2. Eat breakfast.  If you are up too early to really eat, make a smoothie the night before to put on the blender when you wake up and take it with you in the car.  My personal favorite:  ½ cup plain Greek yogurt, ½-1 cup of fruit, ¼ cup egg whites (pasteurized, in a carton), 1-2 Tblsp honey.

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3.  Eat more eggs (especially egg whites).  Eggs have gotten a bad rap, but they are very cheap and very easy to cook.  Cook hard boiled eggs on the weekend to eat for breakfast or snacks during the week.  Make omelets or huevos ranchero for dinner.  Go ahead and spend a little more to get cage-free eggs to do the right thing.

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4. Don’t skip meals.  Even on the worst call day you can keep a meal replacement bar or two in your pocket.

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5.  Pack the food you need for call days the night before so it’s ready to go in the morning.

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6.  Chop up a bunch of veggies on the weekend to throw in salads, soups or in wraps.

7.  Cook or buy one good meal on the weekend that will last for part of the week.   A good stew or soup?  Lasagna?  Look for good recipes on the web.  If you really don’t want to cook, find a healthy caterer or restaurant to buy it instead.

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8.  Take a good sandwich to work for one or more meals.  Peanut butter on whole wheat may be monotonous, but a) it doesn’t have to be refrigerated and b) it beats McDonald’s.

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9.  Free pizza isn’t really free.  It’s incredibly high calorie and the ingredients in the cheap kind aren’t good for you.  (Same for take out Chinese, donuts, muffins, etc)

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10.  Skip the liquid calories.  Cokes may give you an energy boost, but you are better off with real calories from a piece of fruit, a sandwich and some coffee or tea.  (but learn how to use caffeine effectively)

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Zucchini

It’s summer and there are too many zucchinis (and yellow squash, tomatoes and other fabulous summer vegetables).

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Cooking zucchini takes 5 minutes – just sauté them with a little olive oil, salt and pepper and whatever herb you like (tarragon, thyme, basil).  You can add in a little garlic if you’d like or (like the photo and recipe below) some almonds.  Leftovers are great in salads or omelets, so cook more than you need for one meal.

Zucchini with almonds from Smitten Kitchen

One of my all time favorite summer foods is ratatouille, a great food that takes advantage of the bounty of the summer harvest.  It’s easy to make and incredibly delicious.  I suggest you make a big batch – It gets better with time  (at least a few days).  When you get tired of eating it plain you can put it over pasta, eat it cold (particularly good with cottage cheese), or mix it with a grain for a hot meal or salad.

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Ratatouille recipe

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Turkey stuffed zucchini from Skinnytaste.com

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Tomato Zucchini Tart

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Zucchini cups (and 20 more zucchini recipes from Kalyn’s Kitchen)

Getting Ready to Start Medical School

This morning we had a group of medical school applicants at Baylor for a “second look”. They asked some very good questions including the question that prompted me to write this post:

“What should I do to get ready to start medical school?

Set up your environment

The amount of material you will be asked to master in your first year of medical school is more than you’ve ever been asked to master before.  You have to approach it with a different strategy than you used in college.  One critical component of this strategy will be to keep up with the material – starting from the first day.

If you try to hook up your cable, organize your electricity and straighten out parking at your apartment during the first week, you will fall behind.  Take the time to come explore your new environment and get settled in at least a week before classes start.  A week doesn’t sound like much to miss, but it’s a significant amount of information in medical school! One of the important tasks to check off the list during the week you are settling in is to set up your study area.  Make sure you have a computer that will meet your needs and an area to study that is pleasant, ergonomic and comfortable.  Most students find a dual screen to be very helpful as you are moving through notes and slides to study.

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You’ll be spending 1-2 hours studying (at a minimum) for every hour of class.  Given the number of hours you’ll spend studying, you might want to think about an “active” desk that lets you stand, walk or pedal as you study.

Develop (or strengthen) an exercise habit

Use this summer to develop a daily exercise routine that you can take into your new (and crazy) schedule.  Your goal for the summer should be to develop a balanced exercise program (cardio, strength training and flexibility) that works for you.  If you’ve never done any strength training, hire a trainer and learn about it. If you develop a balanced exercise routine this summer, it will be much, much easier to continue this once you start medical school or your internship. Commit to doing at least 30 minutes of exercise a day this summer and it will be a lot easier to continue once the pressure of school really kicks in.

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Running is one of the best (and most convenient) cardio exercises for medical students and residents (because it’s cheap, efficient and effective)  Use this summer to become a runner. If you hate running, find another good cardio exercise habit to develop instead – but pick one!

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If you don’t own a bicycle, think about getting one.  There will be places to ride for fun when you have time off.  You can also use your bike to commute to school which is a great way to sneak in exercise and save money.

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If you don’t know how to cook, learn.

Good nutrition is an important part of doing well academically.  It’s hard to concentrate and learn if you are eating junk. There is one simple trick to eat well during medical school: Learn to cook.  This is a skill that will become progressively more important as you enter your clinical work in medical school and then move on to your residency training.

Learn some basic skills to cook simple things.  If you have good cooks in your family, have them teach you.  If you don’t have family members who can teach you, find cooking classes near you and sign up.  Many high end grocery stores and gourmet stores offer classes for beginners – look on line for classes near you.

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Come to medical school rested.

Do not study. Seriously.  We will give you what you need and nothing you can do this summer will make it any easier.  It’s far more important to arrive rested and ready to go than to try to learn material that may or may not be relevant. Take a real vacation (or two). Visit family and friends – take a road trip and connect with people you haven’t seen in a while  Hang out on a beach, go for some great hikes, read some great novels.  Sleep in late, eat well, and just rest!

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Fast, Easy Recipes: Kalyn’s Kitchen

I’m always looking for good websites for recipes that are healthy, simple and easy to make.  In other words, the kind of food that makes it easy to avoid eating fast food when you are on call.   Kalyn’s Kitchen is a fabulous website for delicious, healthy, and often low calorie recipes that meet the “pizza rule” for medical students and residents (i.e. recipes that take less time to prepare than it takes to order a pizza). She also really goes out of her way to teach each step in the recipe, so if you are new in the kitchen, this is a fabulous website for you!

 

Tuna Salad Lettuce Wraps with Capers and Tomatoes

Not-so-Dumb Salad with Cucumbers, Tomatoes, Onions, Avocado, and Balsamic Vinegar

Mediterranean Tostadas with Hummus, Feta, and Kalamata Olives

Crockpot Double Lentil, Sausage, Brown Rice, and Spinach Soup